Indigenous people want museums to heed TRC’s calls to action

Sophia Reuss recently wrote an article on  how "Indigenous people want museums to heed TRC's calls to action: Cultural institutions have an important role to play in Canada's reconciliation process."  Reuss' piece looks at the role museums and archives play in caring for and presenting materials relating to Indigenous communities and the need to the … Continue reading Indigenous people want museums to heed TRC’s calls to action

Listening: The Henceforward Podcast

I listen to a lot of podcasts and some of those are pure leisure while others inspire critical thinking. Last year I came across The Henceforward, a podcast that "considers the relationships between Indigenous peoples and Black peoples on Turtle Island."  The podcast aims to "reconsider the past and reimagine the future, in the henceforward."  … Continue reading Listening: The Henceforward Podcast

Doing The Work: The Historian’s Place in Indigenization and Decolonization

My most recent piece is a collaborative post with Skylee-Storm Hogan over at Active History.  The post, "Doing The Work: The Historian's Place in Indigenization and Decolonization", looks at the prevalence of the terms Indigenization and decolonization in recent post-secondary conversations.  It also examines meaningful ways in which historians can decolonize and Indigenize their practices. … Continue reading Doing The Work: The Historian’s Place in Indigenization and Decolonization

Ten Books to Contextualize Reconciliation in Archives, Museums, and Public History

My latest post "Ten Books to Contextualize Reconciliation in Archives, Museums, and Public History" can be seen over at Active History.  The post looks at ten books and articles as a starting point for learning about reconciliation, residential schools and indigenous rights in the context of heritage organizations.

Archives of Ontario Family Ties Exhibit

Yesterday the Archives of Ontario launched their sesquicentennial exhibit Family Ties: Ontario Turns 150.  Running until 2018 the exhibit looks at 150 years of Ontario and what Ontario was like at the point of confederation.  The onsite exhibit focuses on four family groups in Ontario during the confederation era.  One of those family groups is … Continue reading Archives of Ontario Family Ties Exhibit

Interactive History: Indigenous Perspectives and the Blanket Exercise

As part of Orientation Week at AlgomaU students, staff, faculty and community members were invited to participate in the KAIROS blanket exercise.  Originally developed in the 1990s as a response to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples the blanket exercise is a participatory teaching too that invites participants to learn about Canadian history from an … Continue reading Interactive History: Indigenous Perspectives and the Blanket Exercise

Reading: Unwritten Histories

A few months ago I stumbled across Andrea Eidinger's Unwritten Histories blog.  If you haven't already come across her site it's well worth a visit.  I've particularly enjoyed her Historian's Toolkit posts and her "What's in My Bag?" series which uses material culture as a lens to examine the past. Andrea has been wonderfully consistent … Continue reading Reading: Unwritten Histories

Neys Provincial Park

Following a great trip to Pukaskwa National Park I kept up the natural history and camping adventure by spending a few nights at Neys Provincial Park.  I was struck by the difference in landscape between the two parks despite them being less than an hour away from each other.  Pukaskwa had very hilly, cliff views … Continue reading Neys Provincial Park

Pukaskwa National Park

Recently I visited Pukaskwa National Park, the only wilderness national Park in Ontario.  The Park features a small campground and 1878 square km of wonderful Northern Ontario natural heritage. I had a wonderful time camping, exploring, and learning about the landscape at Pukaskwa.  We were there prior to the official start of their interpretation season … Continue reading Pukaskwa National Park