Active History Museum Theme

Active History Museum Theme week

This week Carly Ciufo and I launched the ActiveHistory.ca museum theme week.  This week was designed to encourage conversation between museum professionals and historians, while highlighting the labour of museum professionals.

It was a pleasure to work with Carly as a co-editor and we are both very please with how the week turned out. A huge thank you to all of our fantastic contributors. Continue reading Active History Museum Theme

How and When to Invite Indigenous Speakers to the Classroom

Group sitting in a circle of chairs outside

My latest post, “How and When to Invite Indigenous Speakers to the Classroom” written with Skylee-Storm Hogan and Andrea Eidinger can be seen over at Activehistory.ca This post is part of a new  Beyond the Lecture mini-series, specifically dedicated to the issue of teaching Indigenous history and the inclusion of Indigenous content in the classroom.  This post tackles the issue of how and when to invite Indigenous speakers into classrooms.

Unexpected Archival Finds: Shingwauk Student Register

Cover of a green clerks fee book

My latest post, “Unexpected Archival Finds: Shingwauk Student Register” can be found over at Activehistory.ca.   This piece explores the recent discoveru a “Clerk’s Fee Book” that had been re-purposed as a Shingwauk Residential School student register from 1930-1941.  This find by the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre staff provides new information about the students who attended Shingwauk during this period and also inspires questions about archival ethics and unexpected records.

Active History Museums Theme Week

Active History Museum Theme Week poster

Carly Cuifo and I are organizing an Active History theme week about museums! I am super excited about this upcoming series of blog posts and thrilled with the responses we have received so far. Details about the theme week are below:

Active History is organizing a 2019 theme week around museums and museums practice.  Modeled after the 2017 Archives Theme Week this series aims to expand the conversation between historians and museum professionals while highlighting the unique work undertaken in museums.

Blog posts are welcomed on a range of topics including (but not limited to):

  • How do museums actually work? — eg. collection development, exhibit development, research, etc.
  • How are museums places of scholarship and research? (This could be theory based or based on an institutional example)
  • How are museums changing their practices to meet the needs of their patrons (either digitally or on site)?
  • Decolonizing museums
  • Case Study examples of community partnerships within museums

Active History posts are between 700 and 1500 words, avoid jargon, use hyperlinks over footnotes, and we encourage the use of images to illustrate posts. We also ask that the style of writing is accessible to a wide audience. Draft posts are due by February 15, 2019.

Questions and pitches can be directed to series editors Krista McCracken and Carly Cuifo at krista.mccracken@gmail.com

Historical Practice and Media Engagement

Newspaper boxes

My latest post on “Historical Practice and Media Engagement” can be seen over on the Activehistory.ca website.  This post was inspired by the numerous media interviews I’ve done since August in promotion of the Reclaiming Shingwauk Hall exhibition.   It provides a look at some of my strategies for preparing for media interviews and discusses the role of historians in the media.

Photo credit: Jeremy Galliani on Unsplash

Colonialism, Maple Syrup, and Ways of Knowing

Four bottles of maple syrup

My most recent piece “Colonialism, Maple Syrup, and Ways of Knowing” can be seen over on Activehistory.ca.  The post looks at the intersection of maple syrup, national identity, appropriation, and Indigenous knowledge.  The post is definitely just a first look at maple syrup and colonialism, and I would really suggest folks check out the further reading list I included with the post – a lot of great graduate level work has been done on this subject in recent years.

Beyond the Lecture: Innovations in Teaching Canadian History

Today Active History announced “Beyond the Lecture” a new monthly series dedicated to renewed dialogue about best practices for teaching Canadian history at the post-secondary level.  This series is edited by Andrea Eidinger and I and is open to submissions.

How do you approach Canadian history in the classroom? Do you use digital history, public history, collaborative teaching practices? We want to hear about the innovative, experimental, and unique ways you are teaching Canadian history. Check out the full call for submissions for more details or get in touch with Andrea or I if you have questions.

Photo Credit:  Students in a classroom making notes and studying reference books in class. Carleton University, Ottawa, Ont, 1961. Library and Archives Canada, MIKAN Number
4301875.

Interpretation, Interaction, and Critique at House Museums

Two storey stone house with walkway and lawn in front.

My latest post can be read over at Activehistory.ca.  The post, “Interpretation, Interaction, and Critique at House Museums,” discusses using Anarchist Tags in the public history classroom as a way to teach critical thinking skills about heritage spaces and allow students to interact with heritage sites in a new way.  Using the tags was a new experience for me and in the post I explain how they work and reflect on their effectiveness in the classroom.

A huge thank you to Will Hollingshead of the Ermatinger Clergue National Historic Site for his willingness to collaborate on this project and all of his creative ideas that he brought to our class site visit.

Active History Archives Theme Week

Archives Venn DiagramI’m overjoyed by how the Active History Archives Theme Week has come together.  This week emerged after the ‘secret archives’ new story and the subsequent response from the archival community.  The goal of the theme week is to foster discussion between archivists and historians.  Posts in the week tackle issues of archival labour, how private records end up in archives, the legacy of colonial collecting practices, collaboration within archives, and archival outreach.

The theme week includes the following posts: (I’ll update with hyperlinks to the posts once they are live on Active History)

Many thanks to all of the fantastic archivists who contributed to this series.

Archives As Activism

My latest post on “Archives As Activism” can be seen over on Active History. The post explores the connection of archives, activism, and community.

It discusses the idea that archives can disrupt social norms by collecting and archiving the work of those outside of mainstream society.  The piece also dives into examples of Canadian archives who have made an effort to collect material relating to activist movements.

Occupy Vancover signs.
Occupy Vancouver signs, 2011. Public Domain image.