NCPH Election Results

Dictionary definition of vote

Jumping up and down news! (Okay, I admit that I might be the only one who jumps up and down at this news). I was recently elected to the Board of Directors of the National Council on Public History (NCPH). Folks can find the complete election results in the March issue of the Public History News publication. Congrats to Kristen Baldwin Deathridge and Kimberly Springle who were also elected to the Board and congratulations to Gregory Smoak to who was elected as NCPH president.

I talk about NCPH a lot. It is a professional organization that I truly care about and the space that I consider my professional home. The folks who I’ve meet though NCPH are a constant source of inspiration.

Each year I come away from the annual meeting with a sense of renewed love for my profession, enthusiasm for emerging public history practices, and possibilities for projects within my own workplace. For example, the Canada-wide Canadian History Edit-A-thon organized by Jessica Knapp and I developed out of an idea we had at the 2017 annual meeting. Details on this year’s annual meeting, which is being held in Las Vegas from April 18-21, can be found on the NCPH website.

I look forward to serving on the NCPH Board and to giving back to an organization I love.

Revisiting Beyond 150

beyond 150 logo

Remember that awesome Twitter Conference Andrea Eidinger and I organized in August? You can now checkout a select number of the Beyond 150 presentations on the Canada’s History Society website.  Beyond 150 was “designed to encourage collaboration, public engagement, and spark discussion about Canada’s history in a way that is accessible to everyone. It aimed to uplift diverse perspectives, unrepresented histories, and support the work of early-career and emerging scholars.”

The five presentations highlighted by Canada’s History Society include:

I’m still so very happy with how #Beyond15CA turned out. I have gone back to a number of these presentations since the event and used a couple of them in the classroom.  Have a great idea for a 2018 twitter conference theme? Let me or Andrea know!

Digital POWRR Institute Reflections

Long lines of white light on a dark background

Last week I attended the inaugural Digital POWRR Institute in Naperville, IL.  Since 2012, the Preserving digital Objects With Restricted Resources (Digital POWRR) project has been trying to breakdown digital preservation barriers to a wider range of information professionals.  Building on their past workshop model, the POWRR Institutes are designed to provide hands-on learning experiences, are offered free of charge as a way of breaking down cost barriers, and include sessions with digital preservation practitioners.

The two-day Institute in Naperville was fantastic.  It included a theoretical introduction to digital preservation, covered some of the big challenges of getting started with digital preservation, and included a whole lot of ‘playing with all the things’ opportunities where we had a chance to actually test digital preservation tools.  Hands-on workshops included an introduction to the workflow tools (including the open source tools: DataAccessioner, Bagger, and Fixity), web archiving, Archivematica, digital storage, and recovering outdated media.

The Institute was designed in the cohort model – it included 30 participants, but we were then broken into smaller cohort groups with similar backgrounds.  For example, a number of the members of my group came from small post-secondary backgrounds.  The cohort model allowed you to get to know others at the workshop on a more personal level and also allowed participants the opportunity to learn from each other.  The community skill building mentality that was fostered by the cohorts is something I wish more conferences would attempt.

For me the highlight of the Institute was the POWRR Plan that we created while attending.  Each participant was asked to survey their current digital preservation level and come up with a pilot project for moving digital preservation processes forward.  The pilot project was then used to build goals and action items associated with 3, 6, and 12 month milestones.  The Plan included tangible outcomes, small setups towards better digital preservation, and realistic goals.  Each Institute participant also had the opportunity to talk one-on-one with an instructor and develop their plan within that consultation framework.

I love the POWRR Plan idea. I often come away from workshops full of enthusiasm and ideas but unsure of how to apply them to my day-to-day work.  The POWRR Plan helped solidify steps I can make towards better digital preservation strategies and left me with something to reflect on once I returned home.  I am hopeful that in the coming months I can make solid headway on my pilot project and goals.

I would recommend this workshop to anyone with digital preservation responsibilities in a small archive or library, particularly if they have a limited budget or a limited staff.  Four additional Institutes will be offered in 2018 and 2019 and applications for the second Institute are now available online.

Photo credit: Photo by Joshua Sortino on Unsplash

Professional Service: NCPH 2018 Election

Photo of Ryan Gosling in tan suit with words " Hey Girl, Lets Perform Public History Together"

I’m excited to share some news that I’ve been sitting on since October – I’m one of the nominees for this year’s National Council on Public History (NCPH) Board of Directors election.  I’m honored to be nominated alongside such a great slate of candidates. This year’s election is now open to current NCPH members.

NCPH is an organization I talk about a lot. It is my professional home. It is where I have found supportive colleagues and have constantly been inspired to improve my professional practice.  NCPH’s annual meeting is something I look forward to every year, I leave that conference filled with energy and new ideas.  And often I bring those ideas home to build on and develop collaboration around.

I see this nomination as a form of ongoing service. NCPH has given me so much over the years and volunteering to participate within NCPH’s governance structure is one way for me to give back. Want to learn more about this great organization I’m always talking about? Visit NCPH.org.

NCPH Award Deadline

The deadline (December 1, 2017) for a number of this year’s National Council on Public History (NCPH) awards is quickly approaching. A list of the complete award guidelines and information on past recipients can be found online here.  NCPH offers a range of awards including student travel, consultant projects, and new professional awards.  Two of my favorite include:

NCPH Outstanding Public History Project Award
Know of a fantastic and innovative public history project?  This is the award for you. An $1,000 award recognizing a project (digital, print, film, exhibit, etc.) that contributes to a broader public reflection and appreciation of the past or that serves as a model of professional public history practice.

NCPH Book Award
Some of my favorite public history books have won this award in the past and I look forward to seeing who wins in 2018.  This $1,000 award is for the best book about or growing out of public history published within the previous two calendar years (2015 and 2016). This award also includes publications beyond the monograph and works such as exhibition catalogs,  policy studies, and other works that have a clear public dimension are eligible.

Check out the NCPH website for more information on the other awards offered.

Beyond 150 Twitter Conference Update

beyond 150 logoRemember that thing that Andrea Eidinger and I are organizing in partnership with Canada’s History Society, Active History, and the Wilson Institute?  The schedule for the Beyond 150: Telling Our Stories Twitter Conference is now live.  #Beyond150CA is the first-ever Canadian History Twitter Conference and it is happening on Twitter August 24-25, 2017.

The conference  is designed to encourage collaboration, public engagement, and spark discussion about Canada’s history in a way that is accessible to everyone. It also aims to uplift diverse perspectives, unrepresented histories, and support the work of early-career and emerging scholars.  There were a ton of great submissions to the CFP and I’m really excited about the range of presentations that will be part of this conference.

And if you’re not presenting you can still participate! Use the hashtag #Beyond150CA to follow the conversation.  Additionally each 30 minute presentation slot includes 15 minutes for questions and discussions – so get on twitter, ask those burning questions, and engage with the presenters.

Not sure what a Twitter Conference is? Check out the conference FAQ page.

Collaborative Archival Practice: Rethinking outreach, access, and reconciliation using Wikipedia

I had a great time at the 2017 Archives Association of Ontario conference last week.  If you’re interested in the talk Danielle Robichaud and I gave relating to Wikipedia, archives, and reconciliation work our slides are now online.

It was great to meet Danielle in person (and yay for twitter connecting us virtually long before this conference). Many thanks to all who came to our talk.  If you have questions relating to our presentation, using Wikipedia in archives, or Wikipedia editing as reconciliation work feel free to reach out to either Danielle or I.

AAO: Wikipedia and Reconciliation

Headed to the Archives Association of Ontario conference this week? Come join Danielle Robichaud and I on Friday April 28th from 2:30-3:15pm in session 6b.  We’ll be talking Wikipedia and reconciliation and sharing some of our experiences editing Wikipedia within the context of reconciliation.

I’m really looking forward to this talk and hope to see many Ontario archives folks at AAO this year. If you’re planning to be at AAO but you can’t come to our talk please feel free to say hello during the conference.

[Edited for typo fails]

Where to Find Me At NCPH

NCH program cover
NCPH 2017 Program Cover

Next week I’ll be heading to Indianapolis for this year’s National Council on Public History conference. The agenda is filled with great sounding panels, roundtables, and workshops.  I’m really looking forward to connecting with other public history professionals and digging into some public history.

I haven’t selected which panels I’ll be attending during the conference but there are a number of events that I’m helping facilitate as part of my role on the membership committee. There are also a number of broader conference events that I definitely plan on participating in. If you’re interested in connecting during the conference I will be at the following events:

  • Membership Committee Twitter Chat (Wednesday April 19, 11:30am-12:30pm) *Virtual – join the conversation using the #ncph2017 hashtag.
  • First Time Attendee and Mentoring Connection Meetup (Wednesday April 19, 5:30-6:00pm)
  • Opening Reception (Wednesday April 19, 6:00-8:00pm)
  • New Member Welcome (Thursday April 20, 7:30-8:30am)
  • NCPH Business Meeting (Thursday April 20, 1:00-1:30pm)
  • Indy Behind the Scenes: Eiteljog Museum of American Indians and Western Art Walking Tour (Friday April 21, 8:45-10:00am)
  • Public Plenary: Making LGBTQ History American History (Friday April 21, 6:00-7:30pm)
  •  2nd Annual Great NCPH Canuck Gathering (Friday April 21st)
  • Awards Breakfast (Saturday April 22, 8:00-10:00am)

You will also likely find me at individual sessions focused on archives, Wikipedia, podcasting, and Indigenous history.

AAO 2017 Conference

The 2017 Archives Association of Ontario conference is slated for April 26-28, 2017 at the University of Toronto Faculty of Information (iSchool).  This year’s conference theme is “Come Together: Meaningful Collaboration in a Connected World.”  The draft program at a glance is available online and it looks like a great couple of days of programming. Early bird registration just opened and runs to March 12, 2017.  It’s been a couple of years since I’ve had the opportunity to attend AAO – I blame the fact that Sault Ste. Marie is so far from basically everywhere. But this is typically a great smaller conference with lots of friendly folks and good conversation.

As part of the 2017 conference Danielle Robichaud and I will be talking archives and Wikipedia as part of the Digital Storytelling session on Friday April 28, 2017.   April is going to be a busy month for me with both NCPH and AAO within a couple of weeks. But I’m really looking forward to connecting with Ontario archives folks at AAO and presenting with Danielle.