Historical Reminiscents EP 43: Celebrating Milestones

Balloons on pink background with sign saying "yeah!"

The Historical Reminiscents podcast is celebrating its one year anniversary! Given the occasion I thought it would be fitting to talk about celebrating milestones in your work.  In this episode, I talk about honouring milestones of all sizes and making space for celebration.  I also talk about what I’ve learned during the first year of creating a podcast, future plans, and upcoming episode ideas.

I would love to hear any feedback you have on the first year of the Historical Reminiscents podcast. Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.  I’ll be back in January with new podcast episodes – talk to you soon!

Mentioned in this episode:
-Tenure, She Wrote “Always rushing, never celebrating
-Susan Lucas, “How to celebrate success at work

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Historical Reminiscents EP 42: Award Nominations

Episode 42: Award nominations

Your team has completed a fantastic project and you’re considering submitting it for an award but are unsure of how to do so.  In this episode I talk about award nominations, building a project portfolio to support a nomination, and how to build compelling award narratives.

I would love to hear your suggestions for writing successful award nominations. Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
-Anna Tomakh, How to Write an Award Nomination
-Trinity College Dublin, Tips for Writing A Nomination

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Historical Reminiscents EP 41: Managing Meeting Madness

Photo of meeting room with table. Reads: Managing Meeting Madness"

Meetings and committees are part of professional life, more so if you happen to be spending your time inside academia. Despite the role meetings play in professional settings very few public history programs or history graduate training contains information on how to run an effective meeting, building agendas, and facilitating interdepartmental discussion.  In this episode I talk about agenda creation, my favourite kinds of meetings (yes, meetings can actually be enjoyable!), and tips for surviving meeting chaos.

I would love to hear your thoughts about the necessary evil that is meetings. Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
-Jennifer Lundquist and Joya Misra, “Making Meetings Less Miserable
Robert’s Rules of Order

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Historical Reminiscents EP 40: Place Based Learning

Woman showing two children a tree

Last week I spent time with undergraduate students from Huron University College’s history program.  As part of the “Documenting early residential schools” a SSHRC Partnership Engage project between Huron University College, the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre, and the Woodland Cultural Centre students were able to visit the Shingwauk site to learn about the early history and work with some of the archival records documenting the Shingwauk School.  In this episode I talk about the power of place based learning, experiential learning, and the role of archives in teaching history.

I would love to hear your thoughts about place based learning as a tool for teaching history. Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
-Hay T. Johnson, “Place-based learning and knowing: critical pedagogies grounded in Indigeneity
-Ryerson University, Best Practices in Experiential Learning

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Historical Reminiscents EP 39: Pushing Past Creative Barriers

Van trying to get past a herd of sheep.

This week, month, year has been hella hard for a lot of folks, with the news cycle making it extremely difficult to function ‘normally.’ What do you do when you are facing creative blocks, an inability to write, or feelings that whatever you are creating doesn’t matter? In this episode I talk about finding positive work spaces, sources of inspiration, and overcoming creative/intellectual hurdles.

I would love to hear about your sources of support and inspiration. Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
-Andrea Eidinger, “Historical Writing as a Creative Endeavour
-Jonathan Malesic, “The 40-Year-Old Burnout
-Pat Thomson, “Creativity and academic writing – an oxymoron?

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Historical Reminiscents EP 38: Gender, Language, and Professional Life

Rainbow slinky. Right side reads: Episode 38

With the start of the new school year I’ve been thinking a lot about the intersection of language, gender, and creating braver education spaces.  How post-secondary educators and public history facilitators work to be more inclusive in their language, programming, and practices.  In this episode I talk about the #nbdcampaign, pronouns, and small ways you can be more welcoming to folks of all gender identities in your work.

I would love to hear about the ways you work to make your spaces more inclusive, braver, and welcoming. Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
NCPH consultation on including pronouns on conference badges 
No big deal campaign
-Brielle Harbin, Vanderbilt University, “Teaching Beyond the Gender Binary in the University Classroom.”

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Historical Reminiscents EP 37: Practicing Open Access

Open sign hanging in a window. Right side reads' Episode 37: Practicing Open Access."

I’ve been thinking a lot about the implications of where I publish my work, the accessibility of my work to community members, and open access. In today’s episode I talk about peer reviewed journals, popular publishing, and finding open access outlets.

I would love to hear your thoughts on the intersection of history, publishing, and open access initiatives. Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
-“Doing the working: Editing Wikipedia as act of reconciliation.
Outrage over University’s $999 online textbook
-Thomas Peace, “Open Pedagogy: The Time is Now

Download or listen now.

Historical Reminiscents EP 36: Embroidery, History, and Resistance

Heart made out of embroidery floss, right side reads Episode 26: Embroidery, History, and Resistance

I recently started learning to embroider.  My main reason for taking up embroidering was wanting to be stitch swear words radical sayings using a traditional feminine craft.  I loved the idea of juxtaposing feminist praxis with a domestic art.  In today’s episode I talk about the history of embroidery and textile arts as a form of protest and activism.

I would love to hear your thoughts on the intersection of history, fiber arts, and activism. Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
Elizabeth Parker’s Life Story Embroidery Sampler
-Katherine Brooks, “Feminist Embroidery Artist Heather Marie Scholl Explains Why It’s Hard To Be A Woman
-Rozskia Parker, “The Subversive Stitch

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Historical Reminiscents EP 35: Approaching Collaboration

Two lego stormtroopers holding hands. right side reads: Episode 35 Approaching Collaboration.

Collaboration is becoming more and more common in the workplace and in academia.  However, collaborative work practices aren’t something that are typically emphasized in humanities graduate programming. In today’s episode I talk about the impact of collaboration on scholarship and how to reach out to potential collaborators.

I would love to hear other perspectives on the value of collaboration within academia and public history, leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
-Lynne Siemens, “More Hands Means More Ideas: Collaboration in the Humanities
-Seth Denbo, “Whose Work Is It Really?
– Christine Saidi, Catherine Cymone Fourshey, and Rhonda M. Gonzales “When Historians Collaborate, Scholarship Benefits”

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Historical Reminiscents EP 34: Pay People For Their Work

Journal with a dollar sign. Right side reads Episode 34: Pay People For Their Work

Talking about money is hard, but it is an important part of maintaining a healthy professional community.  In today’s episode I talk about fair pay, salary transparency, the underpayment of heritage professionals, and precarious labour.

I would love to hear other perspectives on the value of labour within academia and heritage fields, leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
-Stacie Williams, “Implications of Archival Labour
-Ashley Stevens, “Lessons Learned: This Whole Salary Jazz
-Zoe Todd, Twitter Thread on Salary Negotiation in Academia
-Fobazi Ettarh, “Vocational Awe and Librarianship: The Lies We Tell Ourselves

Download or listen now.