(Re)Active Public History Twitter Mini-Con

Mini-con poster

The NCPH (Re)Active Public History mini-con schedule is now live!  There are some fantastic presentations planned including two great keynotes.  The Thursday October 18th keynote by LaTanya Autry is titled “Beyond Conversations: Transforming Museums through Social Justice Action” and the Friday October 19th keynote “Memory to Action” is by Allison Tucker from the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience.

In addition to the two keynotes there are session from 12:30-7:30 PM on both Thursday October 18th and Friday October 19th.  The theme for the conference is “(Re)Active Public History” and is rooted in a desire to critically discuss the active ways that public historians engage with the public, the past, and historical scholarship. I’m really excited about all of the presentations on the schedule and look forward to participating both days.

Interested in learning more about how you can join the #NCPHactive twitter conference? Check out the tips NCPH has compiled for participants.

(Re) Active Public History Twitter Mini-Con

Poster for Re Active Public History Mini Con with date and hashtag.

NCPH is having it’s first virtual mini-con! Modeled after last year’s Beyond 150 Twitter Conference organized by Andrea Eidinger and I, the “(Re) Active Public History” Twitter mini-con will take place October 18-19, 2018. The CFP for this mini-con is now live and is open to submissions until September 7, 2018.

Like #Beyond150 the #NCPHActive mini-con has no registration fees or travel costs! Just follow #NCPHactive on Twitter to participate.

Want more details on what a Twitter Conference involves? What does a presentation look like? Why should you participate? Check out my History@Work blog post which introduced the NCPH Twitter mini-con.

Launch of Historical Reminiscents

White circle on blue background with text reading "Historical Reminiscents Podcast"

The Historical Reminiscents podcast is dedicated to discussing public history and archival practice. Created and produced by Krista McCracken this weekly podcast discusses archival impulses, shares insight into the world of public historians, and tackles historical interpretations in Canada. Find Historical Reminiscents on iTunes, Stitcher, and Google Play.

Historical Reminiscents is live for all of your listening enjoyment!  This will be a weekly podcast with new episodes appearing every Thursday. However, to start things off I’ve uploaded a number of episodes so folks can get a feel for the format and content.

Episode 01: Digitization, Decolonization and Archival Access
In this episode of Historical Reminiscents Krista McCracken talks about why digitization is not always the answer when thinking about decolonizing archives.  She addresses the challenges of intellectual property rights, community concepts of ownership, and access.

Mentioned in this episode:
“Learning to Listen: Archival Sound Records and Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property” by Allison Mills

Episode 02: Being an Active History Editor
In this episode of Historical Reminiscents Krista McCracken talks about her role as one of the members of the Activehistory.ca editorial collective. She discusses how the site’s editorial collective works, how folks end up writing for the site, and what type of work an editor actually does.

Mentioned in this episode:
Active History Website
About Active History page with details about the editors.

Episode 03: Snow, Heritage Sites and Walking Tours
Winter is coming…or depending on where you live it is already here in full force. In this episode of Historical Reminiscents Krista McCracken talks through some of the challenges of doing outdoor historical interpretation in the winter. Bring on the snow, alternative tour strategies, and multi-media approaches.

Episode 04: The Intersecting Worlds of Public History and Archives
Public History and archives, oh my! In this episode of Historical Reminiscents Krista McCracken discusses the intersection of public history and archives. She talks about common goals between the two fields and highlights the overlapping skill sets of the professions.

Mentioned in this episode:
Tweet by Myron Groover that partially inspired this topic.

Episode 05: Demystifying Archival Labour – Acquisitions and Appraisal 
This episode introduces a mini-series of podcast episodes on “Demystifying Archival Labour.” This mini-series will talk openly and frankly about the work that takes place in archives and provide resources for teaching about archival practice. This first episode dives into acquisitions and appraisal work.

Mentioned in this episode:
Archives Theme Week on Active History
-Sara Janes, “Archives Constructed and Incomplete”
-Roger Gillis, What makes for an archives? A look at the core archival functions

Have strong historical feels? Interested in being a guest on an upcoming podcast episode? Contact me at krista.mccracken[at]gmail.com or on twitter @kristamccracken.

Archives As Activism

My latest post on “Archives As Activism” can be seen over on Active History. The post explores the connection of archives, activism, and community.

It discusses the idea that archives can disrupt social norms by collecting and archiving the work of those outside of mainstream society.  The piece also dives into examples of Canadian archives who have made an effort to collect material relating to activist movements.

Occupy Vancover signs.
Occupy Vancouver signs, 2011. Public Domain image.

Ten Books to Contextualize Reconciliation in Archives, Museums, and Public History

My latest post “Ten Books to Contextualize Reconciliation in Archives, Museums, and Public History” can be seen over at Active History.  The post looks at ten books and articles as a starting point for learning about reconciliation, residential schools and indigenous rights in the context of heritage organizations.

CHA Public History Prize

At this year’s Canadian Historical Association (CHA) annual meeting Active History was announced as winner of the 2016 Public History Prize.

The Public History Prize is sponsored by the  Public History Group of the Canadian Historical Association. The award recognizes work that “achieves high standards of original research, scholarship, and presentation; brings an innovative public history contribution to its audience; and serves as a model for future work, advancing the field of public history in Canada. Nominations are encouraged on the nature and evolution of public history; the workings of memory, commemoration, and their application in public life; archival practice and policy; museum studies; and the presence of historical events and themes in society.”
I’ve been very fortunate to be part of Active History since 2010 and couldn’t be happier about this announcement.  Many thanks to all of our supporters and the hard work of those involved with this project.

Archival Literacy and the Role of Universities in Archival Instruction

My most recent post on archival literacy, learning archival research skills, and the role of universities in archival instruction can be seen over at Activehistory.ca.  In this post I looked at the publicly funded English language universities in Canada to learn more about what type of archival skills are being taught at the undergraduate level and the role of university archives in providing archival instruction.

Friday Reading: #AHIndigenous Week

This week over at Active History guest editor Crystal Fraser put together an amazing line up of posts from Indigenous scholars in Canada.  For more information on the series as a whole check out Crystal’s “Politics and Personal Experience: An Editor’s Introduction to Indigenous Research in Canada.” Every post in this the series was worth reading and the week’s lineup included:

  • Monday, January 11 – Crystal Fraser, Editor’s Introduction; Leanne Simpson, “A Smudgier Dispossession is Still Dispossession”; Zoe Todd, “Conversations with my Father’s Paintings: Writing My Relations Back Into the Academy
  • Tuesday, January 12 – Claire Thomson, “Holding Our Lands and Places”; Daniel Sims, “Not That Kind of Indian”
  • Wednesday, January 13 – Adam Gaudry, “Paved with Good Intentions: Simply Requiring Indigenous Content is Not Enough”; Anna Huard, “A Wrench in the Medicine Wheel: The Price of Stolen Water on Indigenous Cultural Continuity”
  • Thursday, January 14 – Lianne Charlie, “Together Today for Our Children Tomorrow: The Next Generation of Yukon Indigenous Politics”; Norma Dunning, “Strengthening the Nunavut Educational System”
  • Friday, January 15 – Billy-Ray Belcourt, ” Political Depression in a Time of Reconciliation”; Mary Jane McCallum, Title Forthcoming

Canadian Girls In Training: 100 Years With A Purpose

My most recent post, “Canadian Girls in Training: 100 Years With A Purpose” can be seen over at Active History.  I wrote this post after attending a local 100th anniversary celebration of CGIT and learning about the local impact of the organization.  The post also looks at the history of CGIT across Canada and the movement’s links to feminism and changing approaches to education.

Public Spaces and Indigenous Land: Whitefish Island

My latest post, “Public Spaces and Indigenous Land: Whitefish Island,” can be seen over at Active History.  The post looks at the history of Whitefish Island and the challenges of preserving the history of a space when it is located in a high use area.