Gettin’ Air with Terry Green

I was recently a guest on the Gettin’ Air with Terry Green podcast. Gettin’ Air is all about technology-enabled and open learning practices in Ontario Post-Secondary Education.

Terry and I had a great chat and we talked a bit about my work at the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre, Active History, the eCampus Ontario Open Education Fellows Program, and the Beyond the Lecture OER.

Basically, I gushed about all the open projects I have had the privilege and opportunity to participate in. Thank you Terry for the invite! This was a ton of fun to record. Check out the show notes fore more information.

Historical Reminiscents Podcast EP 50: Building An Open Educational Resource

Two robots looking at the letters "OER" on a plate

In this episode I’m talking my recent experience creating the Beyond the Lecture Open Educational Resource (OER) alongside my fantastic collaborator Andrea Eidinger. I discuss the work that went into this edited ebook, decisions about open access, and broader OER work happening in Canada history.

I would love to hear about your experiences using or creating OER. Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
Ten Facts About Open Educational Resources
Confronting Canadian Migration History
Canada History Open Textbook
Open History Seminar: Canadian History

Rapid Reads:
-Sharon Leon, “Getting Tenure in Digital and Public History, as a Non-Man
-Secret Feminist Agenda, Episode 3.26 Master of Text with Ames Hawkins

Download or listen now.

Introducing the Beyond the Lecture ebook

The super secret and exciting project that Andrea Eidinger and I have been working is finally out there in the world! Today we launched Beyond the Lecture: Innovations in Teaching Canadian History, an open educational resource focused on innovative pedagogy in Canadian history.

This is the first ebook in the new ActiveHistory.ca ebook series, with an additional publication being released soon.

Cover design by Taylor Jolin.

Ontario Extend mOOC – Module 4 Stretches

Person stretching with brown trees in background

The #ExtendmOOC I’m currently participating in has ‘stretches’ built into it.  These stretches often pose a question, require some creative thinking, and are quick fun activities,  The stretches are made available throughout each module and are considered extras.  I’ve really enjoyed these activities – partially because a lot of them have involved memes, gifs, and images.  Here are my responses to the module 4 stretch challenges:

Continue reading Ontario Extend mOOC – Module 4 Stretches

Historical Reminiscents EP 37: Practicing Open Access

Open sign hanging in a window. Right side reads' Episode 37: Practicing Open Access."

I’ve been thinking a lot about the implications of where I publish my work, the accessibility of my work to community members, and open access. In today’s episode I talk about peer reviewed journals, popular publishing, and finding open access outlets.

I would love to hear your thoughts on the intersection of history, publishing, and open access initiatives. Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
-“Doing the working: Editing Wikipedia as act of reconciliation.
Outrage over University’s $999 online textbook
-Thomas Peace, “Open Pedagogy: The Time is Now

Download or listen now.

OER and Exploring Pressbooks

Cover of the Healing and Reconciliation Through Education Pressbook.
Cover of the draft Healing and Reconciliation Through Education Pressbook.

I recently starting working with Pressbooks as a way to develop an Open Educational Resource (OER) about residential schools and the history of the Shingwauk Indian Residential School in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

For folks not familiar will Pressbooks, it is a publishing platform that you easily create ebook and print-ready files for printing physical books.  In Ontario, eCampus Ontario has a dedicated Pressbooks instance for folks at universities in the province who are looking to develop OER and open textbooks.   The platform is extremely user friendly, and if you’ve used WordPress you’ll find the navigation and content entry system very similar.  I love the idea of using digital tools to create accessible, open access material for students to use in the classroom.  I also think there is a ton of potential for archives to work with historians to provide primary source material for this type of project.

We’re still very much in the content development phase of this project; but it has been really interesting to think about ways to illustrate the unique history of the Shingwauk Indian Residential School site in connection to the larger residential school system.  This is a history that the Children of Shingwauk Alumni Association and the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre have been collecting and discussing for decades. It’s also a history that has become past of my daily work for the past eight years, either through archival practice or educational outreach programming. The development of OER content has the potential to deliver this history in new ways and to expand the reach of this important work.

I’m also really seeing the benefit of using a platform which supports collaboration.  I’ve been able to bring in a number of conspirators  co-authors to this project and we have been able to jointly develop content and design. I also like the flexibility a digital platform provides – hyperlinks, embedded audio-visual, and photographs are some of the obvious advantages.  In the case of our project we’re also embedding primary source material held by the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre.  It is allowing us to directly connect learns will archival records, archival photographs, and documents which are central to telling the history of the Shingwauk site.

I would love to hear what other public history and Canadian history folks are doing with Pressbooks, OER software, and open textbook development. What are you working on? What resources do you wish existed to support your students?