How and When to Invite Indigenous Speakers to the Classroom

Group sitting in a circle of chairs outside

My latest post, “How and When to Invite Indigenous Speakers to the Classroom” written with Skylee-Storm Hogan and Andrea Eidinger can be seen over at Activehistory.ca This post is part of a new  Beyond the Lecture mini-series, specifically dedicated to the issue of teaching Indigenous history and the inclusion of Indigenous content in the classroom.  This post tackles the issue of how and when to invite Indigenous speakers into classrooms.

Beyond the Lecture: Innovations in Teaching Canadian History

Today Active History announced “Beyond the Lecture” a new monthly series dedicated to renewed dialogue about best practices for teaching Canadian history at the post-secondary level.  This series is edited by Andrea Eidinger and I and is open to submissions.

How do you approach Canadian history in the classroom? Do you use digital history, public history, collaborative teaching practices? We want to hear about the innovative, experimental, and unique ways you are teaching Canadian history. Check out the full call for submissions for more details or get in touch with Andrea or I if you have questions.

Photo Credit:  Students in a classroom making notes and studying reference books in class. Carleton University, Ottawa, Ont, 1961. Library and Archives Canada, MIKAN Number
4301875.

Teaching the Legacy of the Sixties Scoop and Addressing Ongoing Child Welfare Inequality in the Classroom

My latest post “Teaching the Legacy of the Sixties Scoop and Addressing Ongoing Child Welfare Inequality in the Classroom” can be found on Active History. This post look at the connection between colonialism, the residential school era and the sixties scoop.  It also discusses ways in which historians and educators can incorporate sixties scoop history into their classroom spaces.

Museum Teaching Strategies and Inquiry Based Learning

I’m currently participating in a MOOC offered by the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) on art based instruction, museum teaching strategies and inquiry teaching.  Information on the course, “Art and Inquiry: Museum Teaching Strategies For Your Classroom,” is available here.

The course material combines readings, video lectures, and discussion groups.  The focus is on teaching techniques/resources and is based on MoMA’s successful education program.  I signed up for this free course based on a desire to gain another perspective on educational programming.  In 2013 over 1300 people participated in educational programming at my work and a large number of those participants were elementary and secondary school students.  I’m always looking for different ways to engage students in the history of residential schools, visiting art exhibitions, and history more broadly.

The first week’s content focused on the basics of inquiry learning and the use of objects/artwork as instructional tools.  The first week’s readings reinforced the flexibility of artwork and objects in instructional settings — objects can be used to spark conversation with all age groups and engagement with works of art/artifacts can teach critical thinking, observation, and presentation skills. 

I found the video example of the MoMA staff interacting with student groups particularly inspiring.  The staff encourage the students to observe an art work closely, discuss with each other their observations, and compare/contrast what they are observing.  The content helped inspire a couple of ideas about how to facilitate student interaction with artifacts currently on display at my work.

Teaching with Historic Places

The December 2011 issue of Public History News contained an article entitled “Teaching Teachers the Power of Place”, which focused on the Teaching with Historic Places (TwHP) program established by the United States National Park Service.

The TwHP program aims to provide resources for teachers based on the properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places.  Flexible lesson plans, powerpoints, case study examples, and other media tools have been developed by historians and teachers to provide support for any school looking to examine history, geography, or social studies from a place based perspective.

What benefits does place based instruction have? Rooting history or social studies firmly in a place helps make the topic more relevant.  If possible focusing a lesson on a local site helps students create a stronger connection with their community’s past.  The use of historic photographs, artifacts, and documents can make even a far away place seem real and assist in making the past relevant to students.

Overall, the TwHP sounds like a great resource for educators both in and outside of formal education institutions.  Has anyone used a similar resource or been exposed to a Canadian equivalent?

Photo Credit: edebell