Archives Month Series

pen and a piece of paper

For the second year in a row I will be working with Nicole Belolan and Kristin O’Brassill-Kulfan to edit an archives month series for the History@Work blog. It was wonderful working with Nicole and Kristin on the 2019 archives series and I’m looking forward to seeing how the series develops this year.

This year’s series will focus on archival and library practice and labor as well as archives and libraries as public history. Because the COVID-19 crisis has highlighted new challenges surrounding the use and maintenance of archives, the series also welcome pitches from users of archives. 

Pitches are due July 10th and you can see the full CFP here.

Photo by Debby Hudson on Unsplash

Archives Month Series on History@Work

Filing cabinets with archival material.

Over the past couple of months I have been working with  History@Work affiliate editor Kristin O’Brassill-Kulfan, and NCPH The Public Historian co-editor/Digital Media Editor Nicole Belolan to help pull together a month long series of posts about of archives and public history.

This series will be published throughout October (Archives Month in the United States). I’m super excited to see these posts go live as they discuss a huge range of archival work, public history work, and community center history making.

The first post in the series, “Fearless Education: Quaker values, collaboration, and democratized access at Haverford College Quaker & Special Collections” by Liz Jones-Minsinger went live this morning. Go read it and keep an eye out for new posts throughout October.

Image credit: By Daaarum – CC BY 3.0

Archives Association of Ontario – Access & Digital Indigenous Archives

I had the opportunity to be part of the “Access & Digital Indigenous Archives” session at the Archives Association of Ontario Conference on May 9, 2019. I had the pleasure of presenting alongside Karyne Homes (Anishinaabe/Metis) of Library and Archives Canada.

My talk focused on the digital access work of the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre. It centered on showcasing the building of online spaces for community and using the principles of OCAP to guide archival practice. My slides and speaking notes from the talk can be found here.

Upcoming Travel

Map with a wallet on top of it.

I have a bunch of travel coming up in the next few months and as always I would love to connect with public history and archival colleagues while travelling.  In the coming months I’m looking forward to the following events:

  • Kishay Pisim Mamawihitowin – The Great Moon Gathering 2018, Timmins, Ontario, February 14-16th.  I’ll be attending KPM with my colleague Liz Webkamigad, we will be participating in the Gathering by hosting a photo album display on behalf of the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre and by providing a workshop on teaching about Residential Schools.
  • Tri-University Graduate History Conference, Guelph, Ontario, March 9th.  Details about this one are forthcoming – but I’m excited!
  • National Council on Public History annual meeting, Hartford, Connecticut, March 27-30th. This is hands-down my favourite conference every year and attending always feels a bit like heading home to my professional family. I look forward to seeing lots of familiar faces and connected with new folks at NCPH in March.
  • Archives Association of Ontario, Belleville, Ontario, May 8-10th.  It has been a couple of years since I’ve been to AAO and I’m really looking forward to reconnecting with this great group of archivists.
  • Canadian Historical Association annual meeting, University of British Columbia, June 3-5, 2019. Stay tuned for details of what I’ll be up to at CHA.

Get in touch if you’re going to be at any of the above events and want to grab coffee, plot to take over the profession, or just connect in person.

Photo credit: Kira auf der Heide on Unsplash

Breaking down NCPH’s First Twitter Mini-Con

NCPH Active poster

My latest piece, “Breaking down NCPH’s First Twitter Mini-Con” was written in collaboration with Christine Crosby.  Head over to History@Work to our reflections on #NCPHactive.  We take a behind the scenes look at the Twitter mini-con organizing, provide reflections on successes, and consider changes we might make to a similar event in the future.  Personally, I really enjoy the Twitter conference format and would love to explore other ways it can be used to stimulate conversations across disciplines and distances.

Archives As Activism: Community Narrative Building at the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre

As part of the “(re)Active Public History” Twitter mini-con hosted by the National Council on Public History I presented a presentation on the role of the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre as a place of community building and activism.  The complete Twitter presentation is below.

(Re)Active Public History Twitter Mini-Con

Mini-con poster

The NCPH (Re)Active Public History mini-con schedule is now live!  There are some fantastic presentations planned including two great keynotes.  The Thursday October 18th keynote by LaTanya Autry is titled “Beyond Conversations: Transforming Museums through Social Justice Action” and the Friday October 19th keynote “Memory to Action” is by Allison Tucker from the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience.

In addition to the two keynotes there are session from 12:30-7:30 PM on both Thursday October 18th and Friday October 19th.  The theme for the conference is “(Re)Active Public History” and is rooted in a desire to critically discuss the active ways that public historians engage with the public, the past, and historical scholarship. I’m really excited about all of the presentations on the schedule and look forward to participating both days.

Interested in learning more about how you can join the #NCPHactive twitter conference? Check out the tips NCPH has compiled for participants.

(Re) Active Public History Twitter Mini-Con

Poster for Re Active Public History Mini Con with date and hashtag.

NCPH is having it’s first virtual mini-con! Modeled after last year’s Beyond 150 Twitter Conference organized by Andrea Eidinger and I, the “(Re) Active Public History” Twitter mini-con will take place October 18-19, 2018. The CFP for this mini-con is now live and is open to submissions until September 7, 2018.

Like #Beyond150 the #NCPHActive mini-con has no registration fees or travel costs! Just follow #NCPHactive on Twitter to participate.

Want more details on what a Twitter Conference involves? What does a presentation look like? Why should you participate? Check out my History@Work blog post which introduced the NCPH Twitter mini-con.

CHA and Regina Extras

First Nations University Exterior

When I attend conferences I typically try to engage in a couple of activities outside of the conference programming.  This usually means scoping out local museums, heritage sites, and art galleries. While in Regina I was able to squeeze in a few local sights and engage in some more general Congress programming in addition to the sessions offered by the CHA.

On Sunday May 27th I had the chance to attend a Secret Feminist Agenda Podcast meetup at Malty International Brewing.  For folks who haven’t heard of the Secret Feminist Agenda, I highly recommend you download a few episodes and listen.  Hosted by academic Hannah McGregor, this podcast is a great example of digital scholarship.  McGregor has partnered with Wilfred Laurier University Press to develop a platform for the peer-review and critical discussion of the podcast. The meetup was a fantastic opportunity to be in a space with other feminist folks who are pushing boundaries and engaged in exciting scholarship. It was also a chance to connect with some folks from the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities.

I also had the opportunity to check out the Stonecuts and sealskins: Inuit work on paper exhibition at the Fifth Parallel Gallery which featured works from the President’s Art Collection, Shumiatcher donation. Though a relatively small gallery space and a relatively small exhibition Stonecuts and Sealskins included a number of impressive examples of early and contemporary Inuit print making styles.  The show included a couple of Kenojuak Ashevak prints, which I had seen before – but are breathtaking every time I see them.  I am glad I carved out some time during a break to check out this gallery space.

I also stopped by the beaded blanket collage by Katelyn Ironstar.  I loved the participatory art project aspect of this work and the idea of taking up space at an academic conference to reclaim traditional beading styles.  Essentially Ironstar was inviting folks to sit with her, learn about traditional beading, and contribute to a collaborative art piece. The space Ironstar carved out was both mindful and reflective. I think we need more of this within academic spaces.

There were definitely local spaces that I wish I had more time to visit during CHA.  But I am very glad I had the opportunity to step a bit outside the main conference stream and explore.  If nothing else, I now have a few things I want to see in Regina if I ever make my way back through that area.

Photo: Exterior of First Nations University in Regina.

Tweets from CHA 2018

I spent this week at the Canadian Historical Association (CHA) annual meeting.  I was pleasantly surprised by the range of context at this year’s meeting and was thrilled to be able to listen to so many great sessions on public history and Indigenous history.

I live tweeted the majority of the sessions I attended.  I tend to use this as a form of note taking, the tweets definitely aren’t perfect but they provide a nice summary of what was covered by the presenters.

I’m still thinking about the best way to preserve these tweets, but I have made one of the panels – the “Subverting Traditional Historiographies: Seeking Diversity in the Archives and Beyond” panel – into a Twitter moment.  I’d like to do this for all of the panels I tweeted, but it might have to wait until I have more time next week.