That’s My Auntie: Making Accessible Residential School History

two hands passing a black paper heart

This week my colleague Jenna Lemay and I presented “That’s My Auntie: Making Accessible Residential School History” as part of the Maskwacis Cultural College Microlearning Series.

Our webinar focused on specific community digitization and access projects including the Remember the Children project and our recent work with the Shingwauk burial register.

You can view our slides here. Additionally, the session was recorded.

Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Planning Digitization Projects for Community Archives

A pile of 35 mm film rolls

This week I presented a webinar on “Planning Digitization Projects for Community Archives” as part of the Maskwacis Cultural College Microlearning Series.

The webinar focused on the basics of setting up, planning, and implementing digitization projects at community archives. It will include how-tos, potential workflows, and best practices for digitization initiatives. I spoke a lot about some of the digitization work at the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre and share some of the examples of projects we have undertaken.

You can checkout my slides and notes here and you can watch a recording of the session here.

Featured Photo by Andrey Konstantinov on Unsplash

Community Archival Description and Community Access

circle of trees

This week my colleague Jenna Lemay and I presented on “Community Archival Description and Community Access” as part of the Maskwacis Cultural College Microlearning Series.

Our webinar focused on how the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre does archival description and archival access. We provided an overview of the Centre’s approach to both and also discussed specific projects and examples.

You can view our slides here. Additionally, the session and part of the discussion were recorded.

Photo by Martin Reisch on Unsplash

Introduction to Wikipedia as Outreach and Activism

The recording of the second Wikpedia focused webinar in the series I’m hosting with Jessica Knapp from Canada’s History Society is now available. In this webinar Amy Marshall Furness, the Rosamond Ivey Special Collections Archivist and Head, Library & Archives at the E.P. Taylor Research Library & Archives, Art Gallery of Ontario discussed using Wikipedia as a form of activism and outreach.

Amy’s presentation focused on her experience engaging with the Art + Feminism Wikipedia community and her work organizing edit-a-thons at the AGO. This was an excellent webinar and provided a lot of good advice for folks interested in using Wikipedia as a form of community activism, organizing, and outreach.

Next week’s webinar will focus on the basics of Wikipedia editing and how to bring the skill sets of public historians and GLAM professionals into Wikipedia. Join us at 2:00 pm ET on July 26th.

Wikipedia as Outreach and Activism for Canadian History Webinar Series

Wikipedia, Outreach, and Activism, Oh My!

As part of my role at the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre (SRSC) I’ve recently been working with Canada’s History Society to organize a summer webinar series focused on Wikipedia, Outreach, and Activism in relation to Canada’s History.  This four part webinar series will run in July/August and is focusing on how Wikipedia can be used for outreach and activism in relation to Canadian History.

This webinar series is suitable for GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives, and museums) professionals, public historians, and those interested in Canadian history. No experience editing Wikipedia is necessary to participate.  Folks can sign up to participate on the Canada History Society website. We have a great line up of experienced  Wikipedia editors, community organizers, activists, and history folks who are going to be presenting as part of the series.