“That’s my Auntie”: Community-Guided Residential School History

fountain pen writing on a page

My latest piece ““That’s my Auntie”: Community-Guided Residential School History” co-authored with the fantastic Skylee-Storm Hogan can be seen in the KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation studies journal.

Here’s the abstract of our piece:
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada called for increased access to archival material documenting the history of Residential Schools. What does this access and associated programming look like? How can archives approach sharing Residential School history in an ethical and culturally appropriate way? This project report provides examples of reciprocal approaches to archival work by drawing on a case study of the community-guided work undertaken by the Children of Shingwauk Alumni Association (CSAA) and the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre (SRSC).

Laughter Filled the Space: Challenging Euro-Centric Archival Spaces

journal cover

My latest article, written with Skylee-Storm Hogan is now out in the International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion. Our article, “Laughter Filled the Space: Challenging Euro-Centric Archival Spaces” looks at the physical spaces of archives and the ways in which archives can be more welcoming to Indigenous peoples and Indigenous community researchers.

Creation and purpose: A conversation on art created by students at the Shingwauk Residential School

Plant, cup of coffee and a notebook on a table

A conversational piece I wrote with Skylee-Storm Hogan for the Art Libraries Journal is now available.

This piece asks: What are the ethics behind caring, preserving, and displaying artwork created by Residential School Survivors? By looking at sketches and small handicrafts held by the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre this piece examines the possibilities for caring for this unique type of Indigenous artwork in a culturally appropriate and ethical manner.

Photo by Kyle Glenn on Unsplash

Mina Rees Conversation Series – Trans & Gender Diverse Voices in LIS

Poster for conversation series

On November 11th at 1pm ET Kalani Adolpho, Stephen G. Krueger,  and I will be participating in the Mini Rees Conversation Series and talking about the importance of gender diversity and transgender voices within the field of Library and Information Science (LIS).

We’ll also be talking about our new book project Trans & Gender Diverse Voices in LIS – which currently has a CFP out. The conversation series is free and open to all.

CFP for Trans and Gender Diverse Voices in LIS

the word transgender written in blocks

I’m finally able to share some super exciting news! Kalani Adolpho, Stephen G. Krueger and I are editing a book!

Tentatively titled, Trans and Gender Diverse Voices in LIS, this Library Juice Press book will center the lived experiences of trans and gender diverse people in LIS work and education. All authors and editors will be self-identified trans and gender diverse people.

Interested? Want to contribute? You can see the full CFP here.

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash

Stronger Together: The Potential Collaborative Agency of Historians and Archivists

My latest post written with Andrea Eidinger, “Stronger Together: The Potential Collaborative Agency of Historians and Archivists” can be read over on Activehistory.ca.

The piece looks at the recent dust up around the BC archives closure and the subsequent open letter written by history departments. It argues for historians and archivists working together and listening to each other.

Photo by Hannah Busing on Unsplash

Best Article In Indigenous History Prize

I’m honoured and deeply humbled to have won, alongside Madeline Whetung, the Canadian Historical Association Best Article In Indigenous History Prize.

Madeline Whetung’s article “(En)Gendering Shoreline Law: Nishnaabeg Relational Politics Along the Trent Severn Waterway” is a must read. Whetung examines the concept of shoreline law as a means of discussing place-based kinship ties that the Mississaugas hold with water and land and other beings with which they share territory.

My article, “Challenging Colonial Spaces: Reconciliation and Decolonizing Work In Canadian Archives” seeks to highlight existing colonial frameworks within the Canadian archival system and explore the impact of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada on Canadian archival practices.

The article would not have been possible without the guidance of the Children of Shingwauk Alumni, my colleagues at the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre, and the advice of Skylee-Storm Hogan.

Photo by Thor Alvis on Unsplash