Best Article In Indigenous History Prize

I’m honoured and deeply humbled to have won, alongside Madeline Whetung, the Canadian Historical Association Best Article In Indigenous History Prize.

Madeline Whetung’s article “(En)Gendering Shoreline Law: Nishnaabeg Relational Politics Along the Trent Severn Waterway” is a must read. Whetung examines the concept of shoreline law as a means of discussing place-based kinship ties that the Mississaugas hold with water and land and other beings with which they share territory.

My article, “Challenging Colonial Spaces: Reconciliation and Decolonizing Work In Canadian Archives” seeks to highlight existing colonial frameworks within the Canadian archival system and explore the impact of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada on Canadian archival practices.

The article would not have been possible without the guidance of the Children of Shingwauk Alumni, my colleagues at the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre, and the advice of Skylee-Storm Hogan.

Photo by Thor Alvis on Unsplash

Breaking Barriers Through Decolonial Community Based Archival Practice

My latest collaboration with Skylee-Storm Hogan is out in the world. We wrote a book chapter, “Breaking Barriers Through Decolonial Community Based Archival Practice” for Archives and Special Collections as Sites of Contestation edited by Mary Kandiuk.

The chapter discusses the work of the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre (SRSC) as a way of opposing colonial archival impulses. It focuses on community archival practices, with a look at the work the SRSC has done to engage Survivors and communities in digital spaces.

As always, I’m grateful to for the chance to work with Skylee-Storm on this and the chapter is infinitely stronger because of their efforts and insights.

Photo by Jonas Jacobsson on Unsplash

Material Culture Theme Week

This week over on Activehistory.ca we are sharing the Material Culture Theme week I had the joy of editing. This week brings together folks who work with material culture both inside and outside academia.

The week is filled with posts on textiles, learning with material culture, family connections to making, and cultural meaning attached to objects. Go check it out.

A huge thank you to all the contributors and folks who made this week come together. You are awesome.

Material Culture Theme Week

Poster for theme week

Active History is organizing a 2020 theme week around material culture. Modeled after the 2019 Museum Theme Week (http://activehistory.ca/museum-theme-week/) this series aims to expand the conversation about material culture and highlight the work of those studying the materiality of the past.

We welcome contributions from academics, public historians, museum professionals, makers, community practitioners, and anyone engaged in thinking about material culture and the past.

Blog posts are welcomed on a range of topics including (but not limited to):

  • How can object-centred approaches to studying the past change our understanding of history? 
  • What is material culture? How does material culture fit within academic or public history scholarship? 
  • Examples of community-led approaches to material culture research and collecting
  • Decolonizing approaches material culture
  • Case study examples of material culture analysis  

Active History posts are between 700 and 1500 words, avoid jargon, use hyperlinks over footnotes, and we encourage the use of images to illustrate posts. We also ask that the style of writing is accessible to a wide audience. Draft posts are due by February 24, 2020.

Questions and pitches can be directed to series editor Krista McCracken at krista.mccracken@gmail.com

Appropriation vs. Incorporation: Indigenous Content in the Canadian History Classroom

My latest post, written with Skylee-Storm Hogan and Andrea Eidinger for the Activehistory.ca Beyond the Lecture series is up now.

Appropriation vs. Incorporation: Indigenous Content in the Canadian History Classroom” looks how historians can include Indigenous content in post-secondary classrooms, with an emphasis on providing practical steps and resources.

Challenging Colonial Spaces: Reconciliation and Decolonizing Work in Canadian Archives

silver typewriter in shallow focus photography

My latest article, “Challenging Colonial Spaces: Reconciliation and Decolonizing Work in Canadian Archives,” can now be found in the Canadian Historical Review.

For interested folks, here is the abstract for the article:
As historians and the public engage with, address, and teach the history of residential schools, it is important to look at how that history has been recorded, taught, and preserved in Canada. The examination of archival structures illuminates the incompatible nature of many archival practices and Indigenous ways of knowing. Set within a context of reconciliation efforts, this article seeks to highlight existing colonial frameworks within the Canadian archival system and explore the impact of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada on Canadian archival practices.

Photo credit: Peter Lewicki on Unsplash