Community First: Indigenous Community-Based Archival Provenance

My latest article co-written with Skylee-Storm Hogan is out. Titled, “Community First: Indigenous Community-Based Archival Provenance” this article appears in a special issue of Across the Disciplines, focused on unsettling archives.

Here’s the abstract of our article:
Archives contain records that document the lives, cultures, and histories of Indigenous communities that are often organized within a governmental or colonial creation structure. This structure can create barriers to access for Indigenous communities and researchers that depend on those records. This article re-imagines archival methods of organization and proposes archival provenance based on Indigenous community needs and understanding.

Photo by Dee @ Copper and Wild on Unsplash

Residential School Community Archives: Spaces of Trauma and Community Healing

My latest collaboration with Skylee-Storm Hogan, an article titled “Residential School Archives: Spaces of Trauma and Community Healing,” is now available as a pre-print via the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies.

Here’s the abstract:
Colonial archives are sites of trauma, erasure, and grief for many marginalized communities. In Canada the vast majority of archives relating to Indigenous peoples are held by government, church, and non-Indigenous archives. Colonial archives have actively taken Indigenous culture and heritage away from communities and made it inaccessible to those who the records are about.  Many archives containing information relating to Residential Schools have just begun to grapple with the ethical and professional obligations that come from holding records that document colonial violence, abuse, death, and assimilationist practices.

This article explores the practices of the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre (SRSC) community archive and the ways in which the SRSC supports community healing and navigates traumatic archival records.   Since its establishment the SRSC archives has been a place of raw emotion and grief, but also a place of tremendous community strength, healing, and resilience. This article will explore the trauma associated with archives of Residential Schools and the ongoing navigation of archival spaces which embody loss and community.

“That’s my Auntie”: Community-Guided Residential School History

fountain pen writing on a page

My latest piece ““That’s my Auntie”: Community-Guided Residential School History” co-authored with the fantastic Skylee-Storm Hogan can be seen in the KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation studies journal.

Here’s the abstract of our piece:
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada called for increased access to archival material documenting the history of Residential Schools. What does this access and associated programming look like? How can archives approach sharing Residential School history in an ethical and culturally appropriate way? This project report provides examples of reciprocal approaches to archival work by drawing on a case study of the community-guided work undertaken by the Children of Shingwauk Alumni Association (CSAA) and the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre (SRSC).

Laughter Filled the Space: Challenging Euro-Centric Archival Spaces

journal cover

My latest article, written with Skylee-Storm Hogan is now out in the International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion. Our article, “Laughter Filled the Space: Challenging Euro-Centric Archival Spaces” looks at the physical spaces of archives and the ways in which archives can be more welcoming to Indigenous peoples and Indigenous community researchers.

Creation and purpose: A conversation on art created by students at the Shingwauk Residential School

Plant, cup of coffee and a notebook on a table

A conversational piece I wrote with Skylee-Storm Hogan for the Art Libraries Journal is now available.

This piece asks: What are the ethics behind caring, preserving, and displaying artwork created by Residential School Survivors? By looking at sketches and small handicrafts held by the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre this piece examines the possibilities for caring for this unique type of Indigenous artwork in a culturally appropriate and ethical manner.

Photo by Kyle Glenn on Unsplash

Mina Rees Conversation Series – Trans & Gender Diverse Voices in LIS

Poster for conversation series

On November 11th at 1pm ET Kalani Adolpho, Stephen G. Krueger,  and I will be participating in the Mini Rees Conversation Series and talking about the importance of gender diversity and transgender voices within the field of Library and Information Science (LIS).

We’ll also be talking about our new book project Trans & Gender Diverse Voices in LIS – which currently has a CFP out. The conversation series is free and open to all.

CFP for Trans and Gender Diverse Voices in LIS

the word transgender written in blocks

I’m finally able to share some super exciting news! Kalani Adolpho, Stephen G. Krueger and I are editing a book!

Tentatively titled, Trans and Gender Diverse Voices in LIS, this Library Juice Press book will center the lived experiences of trans and gender diverse people in LIS work and education. All authors and editors will be self-identified trans and gender diverse people.

Interested? Want to contribute? You can see the full CFP here.

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash