CFP for Trans and Gender Diverse Voices in LIS

the word transgender written in blocks

I’m finally able to share some super exciting news! Kalani Adolpho, Stephen G. Krueger and I are editing a book!

Tentatively titled, Trans and Gender Diverse Voices in LIS, this Library Juice Press book will center the lived experiences of trans and gender diverse people in LIS work and education. All authors and editors will be self-identified trans and gender diverse people.

Interested? Want to contribute? You can see the full CFP here.

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Where I’ll Virtually Be This Fall

typerwritter with paper saying "Update"

This year seems to be the year for virtual conferences, online professional development, and webinars. In October I’ll be participating and presenting at a number of virtual conferences including:

  • I will be presenting as part of the Canadian Research and Knowledge Network (CRKN) virtual conference. My presentation, ” Community Based Access: Preserving and Sharing Indigenous Archival Materials” will be on October 13th and is part of the access and preservation week. The CRKN conference is completely virtual and free this year.
  • I’m super happy that I get to participate in TESS again this year. This is a fantastic conference and learning opportunity organized by eCampus Ontario. I’m going to be talking about empathy and teaching about the history of Residential Schools in virtual settings. TESS is free and runs from October 20th to 21st.
  • Lastly, Elizabeth Edgar-Webkamigad and I will be presenting “Reclaiming Shingwauk: Cross-Cultural Learning and Programming” as part of the Ontario Museum Association Annual Conference on October 29, 2020.

What virtual conferences and knowledge sharing opportunities are in your schedule for the fall?

Photo by Markus Winkler on Unsplash

That’s My Auntie: Making Accessible Residential School History

two hands passing a black paper heart

This week my colleague Jenna Lemay and I presented “That’s My Auntie: Making Accessible Residential School History” as part of the Maskwacis Cultural College Microlearning Series.

Our webinar focused on specific community digitization and access projects including the Remember the Children project and our recent work with the Shingwauk burial register.

You can view our slides here. Additionally, the session was recorded.

Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Safe Spaces for LGBTQ2S+ Archivists

rainbow flag colours in water

The Archives Association of Ontario (AAO) is hosting a number of virtual safe spaces over the next year, including spaces for LGBTQ2S+ archivists.

These spaces are for LGBTQ2S+ archivists to connect and meet with one another in an informal, participant-driven environment. Folks must identify as LGBTQS+ to participate.

I’m going to be acting as the moderator/facilitator for the LGBTQ2S+ spaces and would love for folks to share this with others who might find the space useful. Registration is required but the space is open to both AAO members and other archives folks.

Photo by Jordan McDonald on Unsplash

Community First: Open Practices and Indigenous Knowledge

Pine branches in background reads Community First: Open Practices and Indigenous Knowledge

As my capstone project for my time as an eCampus Ontario Open Education Fellow, I worked with Skylee-Storm Hogan to write a white paper on Open Education and Indigenous Knowledge.

This white paper looks at the current state of Open Education Resources in Canada and the integration of Indigenous Knowledge into OER. Spoiler – it is pretty sparse and there’s more work to do. We also provide some recommendations of how OER creators can think critically about sharing Indigenous Knowledge and work on building relationships with Indigenous folks.

You can see the complete report here.

Planning Digitization Projects for Community Archives

A pile of 35 mm film rolls

This week I presented a webinar on “Planning Digitization Projects for Community Archives” as part of the Maskwacis Cultural College Microlearning Series.

The webinar focused on the basics of setting up, planning, and implementing digitization projects at community archives. It will include how-tos, potential workflows, and best practices for digitization initiatives. I spoke a lot about some of the digitization work at the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre and share some of the examples of projects we have undertaken.

You can checkout my slides and notes here and you can watch a recording of the session here.

Featured Photo by Andrey Konstantinov on Unsplash

Community Archival Description and Community Access

circle of trees

This week my colleague Jenna Lemay and I presented on “Community Archival Description and Community Access” as part of the Maskwacis Cultural College Microlearning Series.

Our webinar focused on how the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre does archival description and archival access. We provided an overview of the Centre’s approach to both and also discussed specific projects and examples.

You can view our slides here. Additionally, the session and part of the discussion were recorded.

Photo by Martin Reisch on Unsplash

Reclaiming Shingwauk Hall Behind the Scenes

Reclaiming Shingwauk Hall poster

Earlier this week, as part of the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre’s ongoing webinar series I presented a Behind the Scenes look at the Reclaiming Shingwauk Hall exhibition space.

My talk focused on the Survivor community based approach of the exhibition, challenges of installing an exhibit in a University hallway, and decisions around which photos to include.

You can see my slides with notes here. And the recording of the webinar is available here.

Stronger Together: The Potential Collaborative Agency of Historians and Archivists

My latest post written with Andrea Eidinger, “Stronger Together: The Potential Collaborative Agency of Historians and Archivists” can be read over on Activehistory.ca.

The piece looks at the recent dust up around the BC archives closure and the subsequent open letter written by history departments. It argues for historians and archivists working together and listening to each other.

Photo by Hannah Busing on Unsplash