Historical Reminiscents Podcast EP 57: Short Form Presentations

Hand holding a watch on left. Right reads "Episode 57: Short Form Presentations"

In today’s episode I’m talking about Ignite presentations, lightening talks, and Pecha Kucha presentations. How do you prep for these fast paced presentations? I also chat about where these short presentation formats fit within the conference landscape.

Mentioned in this episode:
The Secret Underground World of Lego Ignite Talk
Fighting Dirty in Scrabble Ignite Talk
About Ignite Talks

Rapid Reads:
-“Home Isn’t Home” by Makayla Webkamigad

Photo by Saffu on Unsplash

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Archives Month Series on History@Work

Filing cabinets with archival material.

Over the past couple of months I have been working with  History@Work affiliate editor Kristin O’Brassill-Kulfan, and NCPH The Public Historian co-editor/Digital Media Editor Nicole Belolan to help pull together a month long series of posts about of archives and public history.

This series will be published throughout October (Archives Month in the United States). I’m super excited to see these posts go live as they discuss a huge range of archival work, public history work, and community center history making.

The first post in the series, “Fearless Education: Quaker values, collaboration, and democratized access at Haverford College Quaker & Special Collections” by Liz Jones-Minsinger went live this morning. Go read it and keep an eye out for new posts throughout October.

Image credit: By Daaarum – CC BY 3.0

Historical Reminiscents Podcast EP 56: Archives and the TRC Calls to Action

Orange circle on a black background

In honour of Orange Shirt Day today’s episode is dedicated to Residential School Survivors all across the land and to those who didn’t return home from their time at Residential School. In today’s episode I discuss the TRC’s Calls to Action and their relationship to archival practice.

Note – I made a numerical error when talking about the TRC Calls to Action, it is call number 69 not call number 60 that speaks to the operation of Library and Archives Canada.

Mentioned in this episode:
TRC Calls to Action (PDF)
Residential School Memorial Register
-Crystal Fraser and Zoe Todd, “Decolonial Sensibilities: Indigenous Research and Engaging with Colonial Archives in Canada

Rapid Reads:
-Allison Jones, Hazel Jane Plante, Leah Tottenham, Shelby, and Syr “Not Cis in LIS: A Roundtable Discussion about being Trans in Libraries

Photo by Jeremy Perkins on Unsplash

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Reclaiming Place Talks

This week I had the privilege of travelling to Thunder Bay to provide a public talk at the Thunder Bay Museum and speak with a Lakehead University archives class. Both talks focused on my work at the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre and the decades of work by the Shingwauk Survivor community.

Interested in learning more? Check out my slides from my “Reclaiming Place: Community History at the Shingwauk Site” talk at the museum and my more archives focused talk from my visit to Lakehead.

Historical Reminiscents Podcast EP 55: Community Based Digitization

Web of connections right side reads: "Episode 55: Community based digitiztaion"

In this episode I discuss the recent conclusion of the “Healing and Education Through Digital Access” project undertaken by the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre. I talk about community engagement, how not all information wants to be free, and online access.

I would love to hear about your experiences working with community to undertake a digitization project. Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
Press release for the Digitized Shingwauk Letter Books
Archival listing of Letter Books
OCAP Principals
Tara Robertson, “Not All Information Wants to be Free: The Case Study of On Our Backs

A huge thank you to my colleague Jenna Lemay who did much of the heavy lifting on this project and who was responsible for developing the metadata for the Letter Books.

Download or listen now:

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Historical Reminiscents Podcast EP 54: Virtual Talks And The Cost Of Travel

Line of colourful chairs, right side reads "Episode 54: Virtual Talks"

Recently I’ve had the opportunity to virtually participate in a couple of roundtables and to provide virtual lectures. In this episode I reflect on the how virtual lectures work, tech challenges, and distance engagement. I also discuss the real costs and privilege of academic travel.

I would love to hear about your experience giving or listening to a virtual lecture. Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
2020 Visions for Environmental History series
-Jaymie Heilman, “Grounded: Academic Flying in the Time of Climate Emergency
CFP for Canadian Historical Association 2020 Annual Meeting

Rapid Reads:
– Katherine Roscoe, “Is Digital Crime History Too White? Representation in Australian Archives

Read the download, or listen now.

Photo credit: Jan Genge on Unsplash

Preserving and Listening to Soundscapes

Closeup of a sound board

The BBC recently ran a podcast series called Forest 404. The podcast is set in a futuristic 24th Century, in a time after a massive data crash and in a era in which forests and much of the natural world no longer exist.

I initially started listening to Forest 404 because the protagonist is voiced by Pearl Mackie, who I loved in Doctor Who. The entire podcast is framed around archived soundscapes from the 21st century (know affectionately as the ‘Old World’ in the podcast).

The main character Pan is essentially a digital archivist who makes decisions about what sounds are worth keeping and which sounds get destroyed from the archive and the world’s memory.

The fact that this entire podcast intersects with climate, archiving, and science fiction make it worth listening to. For me, this podcast also made me think about broader archival efforts to document sounds and soundscapes.

Continue reading Preserving and Listening to Soundscapes

Appropriation vs. Incorporation: Indigenous Content in the Canadian History Classroom

My latest post, written with Skylee-Storm Hogan and Andrea Eidinger for the Activehistory.ca Beyond the Lecture series is up now.

Appropriation vs. Incorporation: Indigenous Content in the Canadian History Classroom” looks how historians can include Indigenous content in post-secondary classrooms, with an emphasis on providing practical steps and resources.

Podcasting, Scholarship, and History Talk

Earlier today I had the pleasure of providing a virtual talk on podcasting, scholarship, and public history. My talk focused on how podcasts can be forms of scholarship and outreach. I also spoke about my experience recording the Historical Reminiscents podcast.

For folks interested, my slides and notes are up on Google Slides.