Gettin’ Air with Terry Green

I was recently a guest on the Gettin’ Air with Terry Green podcast. Gettin’ Air is all about technology-enabled and open learning practices in Ontario Post-Secondary Education.

Terry and I had a great chat and we talked a bit about my work at the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre, Active History, the eCampus Ontario Open Education Fellows Program, and the Beyond the Lecture OER.

Basically, I gushed about all the open projects I have had the privilege and opportunity to participate in. Thank you Terry for the invite! This was a ton of fun to record. Check out the show notes fore more information.

Historical Reminiscents EP 30: Podcasting As Scholarship

Iphone with headphones sitting on a book. Right side reads "Episode 30: Podcasting as Scholarship"

While attending the Canadian Historical Association annual meeting in Regina I attended a meetup for the Secret Feminist Agenda podcast.  Part of this meetup included a launch of the open peer review of the podcast.  This experience got me thinking about the scholarship behind podcasting.  Can podcasts count as academic work? Do they need to be peer reviewed? What are the logistics behind podcasts being accepted as work as part of tenure or promotion?

I would love to hear how other peoples thoughts on podcasts as scholarship, do they count? Leave a comment or send me a message on Twitter.

Mentioned in this episode:
Open Peer Review of the Secret Feminist Agenda
NCPH launches review of podcasts and blogs
Tenure and Promotion and the Publicly Engaged Academic Historian (PDF)
The Henceforward 

Download or listen now.

CHA and Regina Extras

First Nations University Exterior

When I attend conferences I typically try to engage in a couple of activities outside of the conference programming.  This usually means scoping out local museums, heritage sites, and art galleries. While in Regina I was able to squeeze in a few local sights and engage in some more general Congress programming in addition to the sessions offered by the CHA.

On Sunday May 27th I had the chance to attend a Secret Feminist Agenda Podcast meetup at Malty International Brewing.  For folks who haven’t heard of the Secret Feminist Agenda, I highly recommend you download a few episodes and listen.  Hosted by academic Hannah McGregor, this podcast is a great example of digital scholarship.  McGregor has partnered with Wilfred Laurier University Press to develop a platform for the peer-review and critical discussion of the podcast. The meetup was a fantastic opportunity to be in a space with other feminist folks who are pushing boundaries and engaged in exciting scholarship. It was also a chance to connect with some folks from the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities.

I also had the opportunity to check out the Stonecuts and sealskins: Inuit work on paper exhibition at the Fifth Parallel Gallery which featured works from the President’s Art Collection, Shumiatcher donation. Though a relatively small gallery space and a relatively small exhibition Stonecuts and Sealskins included a number of impressive examples of early and contemporary Inuit print making styles.  The show included a couple of Kenojuak Ashevak prints, which I had seen before – but are breathtaking every time I see them.  I am glad I carved out some time during a break to check out this gallery space.

I also stopped by the beaded blanket collage by Katelyn Ironstar.  I loved the participatory art project aspect of this work and the idea of taking up space at an academic conference to reclaim traditional beading styles.  Essentially Ironstar was inviting folks to sit with her, learn about traditional beading, and contribute to a collaborative art piece. The space Ironstar carved out was both mindful and reflective. I think we need more of this within academic spaces.

There were definitely local spaces that I wish I had more time to visit during CHA.  But I am very glad I had the opportunity to step a bit outside the main conference stream and explore.  If nothing else, I now have a few things I want to see in Regina if I ever make my way back through that area.

Photo: Exterior of First Nations University in Regina.

Announcing the Historical Reminiscents Podcast

White circle on blue background with text reading "Historical Reminiscents Podcast"

If you know me chances are you also know I have serious feels about podcasts.  I like them.  A lot.  For over a year I’ve been tossing around the idea of starting my own podcast.  I went back and forth numerous times on what to create a podcast about –  public history, fandom, or craft beer in the North.  After much stalling, mostly out of fear, I’ve committed to creating the Historical Reminiscents Podcast.

Part of my podcast creation fear was around the idea that I needed other people to create a podcast.  A lot of podcasts are based on conversation and include more than one person.  I didn’t know who I could approach to create a podcast with me. What if there was just me? Would it sill work? And would people be interested in listening to me talk? Eventually I shoved all those fears and nagging questions aside and decided to dive in.

Inspired by some of my favoruite short solo podcasts such as Katie Linder’s You’ve Got This and Chip Sudderth’s Two-Minute Time Lord  I’ve decided to enter the solo podcast world and create something dedicated to public history practice, archival impulses, and historical insights.  Both Linder’s and Sudderth’s podcasts were designed to feature just one person, on a weekly basis, for a relatively short period of time – 10 or 2 minutes respectively.  After listening to a ton of solo podcasts I kept coming back these two podcasts as a format that I could work with and fit into my life.

The Historical Reminiscents podcast, named after the original history blog I started in 2008, is currently in production with plans to release the first episode later this month. Despite deciding to go the solo route I would definitely welcome guests on this podcast.  Interested in chatting about the shape of public history or archives in Canada? Connect with me on twitter (@kristamccracken) or send me an email at krista.mccracken[at]gmail.com