Historical Reminiscents EP 29: Representation and Making Space in Public History

White phone with "Ask More" written on back laying on yellow flowers.

Representation matters.  Seeing people like yourself within your profession, in leadership roles, and succeeding in their work can make a huge impact on the careers of new and emerging professionals. In today's episode I talk about the lack of diversity within public history, archives, and the heritage field more broadly.  I also provide examples of … Continue reading Historical Reminiscents EP 29: Representation and Making Space in Public History

CHA 2018: Gathering Diversities

Highway and sky in distance.

Next week I'm headed to Regina for the Canadian Historical Association (CHA) annual meeting.  I'm looking forward to connecting with colleagues and to taking in a number of great sessions.  If you are going to be in Regina you can likely find me at the following events: Monday May 28th Bright and early at 8:30am … Continue reading CHA 2018: Gathering Diversities

CHA Reads 2018

It is that time of year again! The Unwritten Histories blog is hosting the second annual edition of CHA Reads. Over the course of this week, five scholars will argue why their book should win the coveted CHA book prize. This year, I'm participating by 'defending' Susan M. Hill's The Clay We Are Made Of: Haudenosaunee Land Tenure on … Continue reading CHA Reads 2018

Summer Reading Plans

Person reading a book on a couch. Sign saying "Sorry for what I said when it was winter"

It is finally warm outside! And though summer is still awhile away, Spring is definitely in the air and I have been thinking about my summer reading goals.  I also have a fair bit of travel coming up in May and June, so I plan on getting a head start on some summer reads.  My … Continue reading Summer Reading Plans

Historical Reminiscents EP 28: Spring Cleaning Your Work Life

Blue flowers on left. Right side reads: "Episode 28: Spring Cleaning Your Work Life."

It is finally warm here! And flowers are starting to grow! As Spring rolls around I've been getting the urge to start Spring cleaning.  What does Spring cleaning mean for folks working in academia and public history? How do you set yourself for success in the coming season?  In this episode I chat about shaking … Continue reading Historical Reminiscents EP 28: Spring Cleaning Your Work Life

Indigenous Archival Material, Open Access, and Decolonization

Map of the united states

The Newberry Library recently released a digitized collection of early 20th Century drawings by the Lakota community.  These drawings are part of the Edward E. Ayer Collection which contains artworks, books, and other material relating to Indigenous culture.   These drawings were created in 1913-1914 and are now in the public domain. Any press content I've … Continue reading Indigenous Archival Material, Open Access, and Decolonization

Building Bridges and Reading Across Disciplines

black and white Drone view of San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge.

During one of my recent writing projects I started thinking about the implications of disciplinary silos and the value to reading across disciplines. A lot of my work is grounded in archival theory and public history practice, however it often intersects with the Canadian academic history profession.  From an outsider differentiating these three disciplines may … Continue reading Building Bridges and Reading Across Disciplines

Historical Reminiscents EP 27: Diving Into Twitter for Canadian History

Wooden stairs going into a lake. Right side reads " Episode 27: Diving Into Twitter for Canadian History"

I use Twitter a lot and believe it can be a fantastic resource of Canadian historians and public history practitioners.  In this episode I discuss how to get the most our of Twitter, the potential of Twitter for community building, and the conference applications of the platform. I would love to hear about your experience … Continue reading Historical Reminiscents EP 27: Diving Into Twitter for Canadian History

Historical Reminiscents EP 26: The Grant Writing Learning Curve

Mason jar with lights in it. Right side reads "Episode 26: The Grant Writing Learning Curve."

If you work in the heritage field or for a non-profit there is a good chance you've been involved in grants in some way shape or form. Despite the prevalence of grant writing in public history not all public history students are trained in how to apply for grants. In this episode I discuss what … Continue reading Historical Reminiscents EP 26: The Grant Writing Learning Curve

Métis Nation of Ontario Root Ancestors Project

On April 24, 2018 Stacey Devlin of Know History presented a talk at Algoma University focused on the Métis Nation of Ontario Root Ancestors Project.  This fantastic project aims to increase resources and accessibility of information about the unique history and development of Métis communities in Ontario. The Root Ancestors Project was developed based on feedback … Continue reading Métis Nation of Ontario Root Ancestors Project